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Dancing Duet~

The Royal Botanical Gardens in Sydney Australia are an urban bird paradise.

I found this pair of magpie larks singing and dancing happily in the park.

The name magpie lark is a misnomer as these handsome birds are neither magpies nor larks, but are members of the giant monarch flycatcher family.

Magpie larks are musical prodigies who sing co-ordinated duets together, timed by the metronomic movements of their synchronized dancing. See: http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20160803-the-strange-reason-magpie-larks-dance-when-nobody-is-looking

Cheers to you from the magical birdies of Oz~

Sulphur Crests~

and golden tails,

feast on pine cones,

by bush lagoons.

Raucous flocks,

rest on scribbly gums.

While a curious cockatoo,

climbs down to me.

Cheers to you from Australia’s gorgeous sulphur crested cockatoos~

Note: Scribbly Gum are a type of NSW eucalyptus tree that have distinctive scribbles on their bark left by larval scribbly gum moths.

Tasmania’s Wild Creatures~

Dolerite Columns rise up to 980 feet from the sea in Cape Raoul Tasmania.

Dolphins fish,

and fly,

off the eastern coast.

Echidna encountered on the trail. Echidnas, like platypus, are the world’s only egg laying mammals or monotremes.

He buries his face in the ground to hide from us!

Endangered Tasmanian Devil stares at the camera lens at Bonorong Wildlife Rescue, Hospital & Sanctuary, in Brighton Tasmania.

Tasmanian Devils are carnivorous marsupials once endemic in Australia, but now wild only in Tasmania.

Sleepy wombat at Bonorong. Wombats are herbivorous marsupials native to Australia and Tasmania. They are one of the rarest land mammals in the world.

Cheers to you from stunning Tasmania and her wild creatures~

For more about Bonorong and the work they do, check out: https://www.bonorong.com.au/

Bush Stone Curlew~

Whose hiding here?

A mama curlew and her chick, that’s who! (You can see the camouflaged chick in the first photo in the upper right if you look carefully).

Mama quickly proceeded to lead me away from her chick,

like a good protective mama bird.

Bush Stone Curlews are ground dwelling, carnivorous birds native to Australia. They can fly, but rely on concealment to evade predation.

Cheers to you from the clever, camouflaged, curlews~

Your Own Flying Rainbows~

It’s harder to be upset,

when visited by flying rainbows.

Especially when they decide,

to join your picnic.

Flying fluffs,

of rainbow hope,

on wing!

Cheers to you from your friends the lorikeets and me~

Satin Bowerbirds~

Satin Bowerbirds are native to Australia. The birds pictured here are females. Males are dark black, but have the same startling blue eyes.

Bowerbirds are named after the elaborate stick structures called bowers that males build to attract a mate.

They use found objects, to decorate their bowers, the flashier and bluer, the better!

Females inspect the bowers, while the males dance near them, and females choose their mate based both on the dance and the bower.

Bowers are decorated with anything colorful the birds find, like pens, buttons, blue plastic, blue balloons, blue bottle caps, blue feathers etc. There have a definite preference for blue colors that match their eyes!

I am impressed with any guy who will not only build a house for his mate, but shop till he drops to decorate it, and dance for her too!

Wow!

I didn’t find any bowers in Australia, but here is an image of a bower that I found on The San Diego Zoo’s website.

Photo Source: San Diego Zoo.org

Cheers to you from the lucky female Australian Bowerbirds~

Pied Currawong~

I know just how this bird is feeling.

.

This is my face after reading the news.

I also relate to the stressful snacking,

and that guilty look afterwards.

Birds seem to always understand us.

Hope these guys bring smiles and cheers, to you, from me at The Holler~

Note: Pied Currowangs are omnivorous birds from Eastern Oz.