Feathered Pairs~

Big Gulp Gull,

swallows his catch, Coeur d’Alene Idaho.

Bald Eagle,

and juvenile, catch grizzly salmon scraps, British Columbia Canada.

Saddle Bill Stork catches a cat,

Kruger National Park, South Africa.

Red Tailed Hawk,

loves rare water, Southern California.

A pair of Yellow Legs multiply in reflection, Salton Sea, California.

Greater Flamingos tango, Tagus Estuary Portugal.

Mated White Storks greet on their nest, Alsace France.

Cheers to you from your feathered friends~

249 thoughts on “Feathered Pairs~

  1. Never a gull moment looking at these spectacular shots! Way to go, Gull friend! โ‹‹(โ€˜ฮ˜โ€™โ—)โ‹Œ :.ใ€‚โœฏโค๏ธโค๏ธโค๏ธ

  2. How lucky you are to have seen so much of the world and its wonders! And how lucky *we* are to have you share what you’d seen with us โค๏ธ

    Looking at those first few photos makes me feel like I’ve got something stuck in my throat ๐Ÿ˜‚

  3. What fun to see a Saddle-billed Stork in this outstanding collection of photographs! Your keen eye – and quick finger – give us enormous pleasure.

    • Thank you Hans. Yes gulls are voracious, and so smart. They used to steal silver napkin rings from an elegant hotel near where I grew up and fly off with them. Many years later all the rings were found in an unused bell tower at the hotel.
      A gull stole a toy duck from my son when he was three. He said to me, “Don’t worry they’ll bring it back.”
      I tried to tell him the gull wouldn’t return it, but my son wouldn’t listen. Several hours passed. As we were packing up to go, the gull swooped down, and dropped the duck on the sand. My son said, “I told you so!”
      I think they like some people more than others!!! ๐Ÿ˜‰

      • Here where I live, they are best known for stealing ice cream or sausages from the hands of people, just when they paid. The staff at the serving have shirts with a printed message “Watch up for the seagulls”, they usually attack from the roof above namely.

    • Thank you Margaret. Your thoughtfulness is most appreciated. I definitely takes lots of duds!! Sometimes if the photo is bad, but I love the subject, it is hard for me not to post it. แƒ“

  4. You have really excelled even yourself with this batch – fearsome, elegant, reflective, and making patterns

  5. Top Photos Cindy. on the third from last photo you show a bird that we also have very often a “redshank” i will show photos of it in my netx post. i would be interested in whether it is the same species

      • You are undisputedly right, due to climate change and other reasons that we often cannot understand, birds come to regions where they shouldn’t be normal.
        Flamingos have been settling in my environment for years and raise their nestlings. In another protected area there are red-shouldered ducks whose home is definitely not Germany.
        VG Werner

    • Thank you Michael. An entire hare! WOW. Apparently aquatic birds swallow feathers, lots of them, to cushion the fish bones route through their bodies. I just found this out because someone asked. See: Eating Feathers
      “Perhaps because the idea of swallowing hair is so unpleasant to us, it is difficult to believe the stories of birds deliberately eating their feathers. Nonetheless, some do and they do so regularly. Grebes, for example, consume their feathers by the hundreds. Feathers taken from parents are found in the stomachs of chicks only a few days old. Fifty percent of the stomach contents of a Horned or Pied-billed Grebe may be feathers. This odd behavior seems to have a purpose.

      The action of the gizzard in these primarily fish-eating birds is insufficient to crush the bones that are swallowed. The feather balls are thought to protect the stomach by padding the sharp fish bones and slowing down the process of digestion so that the bones dissolve rather than pass into the intestine. This notion is supported by the observation that the Least Grebe, which of all the grebes consumes the fewest fish, also accumulates the smallest feather ball. Comparative studies of the gizzards and digestive physiology of fish-eating birds are needed to test this hypothesis. If it is supported, the question will then be why grebes have not evolved digestive tracts that can function efficiently without being stuffed with feathers.”

  6. Cindy these photos are so beautiful. Makes me want to cry a bit. Then I thought – what happens to the fish bones? How are they digested? Hmm

    • Awwww…… So very kind. Thank you! I had no idea about the fish bones and it is a fascinating question. I may have found the answer through google of course, check out: “Eating Feathers
      Perhaps because the idea of swallowing hair is so unpleasant to us, it is difficult to believe the stories of birds deliberately eating their feathers. Nonetheless, some do and they do so regularly. Grebes, for example, consume their feathers by the hundreds. Feathers taken from parents are found in the stomachs of chicks only a few days old. Fifty percent of the stomach contents of a Horned or Pied-billed Grebe may be feathers. This odd behavior seems to have a purpose.

      The action of the gizzard in these primarily fish-eating birds is insufficient to crush the bones that are swallowed. The feather balls are thought to protect the stomach by padding the sharp fish bones and slowing down the process of digestion so that the bones dissolve rather than pass into the intestine. This notion is supported by the observation that the Least Grebe, which of all the grebes consumes the fewest fish, also accumulates the smallest feather ball. Comparative studies of the gizzards and digestive physiology of fish-eating birds are needed to test this hypothesis. If it is supported, the question will then be why grebes have not evolved digestive tracts that can function efficiently without being stuffed with feathers.”

  7. Those are all beautiful, Cindy. I love the big fish going down the hatch. Doesn’t seem that they should be able to do that, and it is amazing to see. ๐Ÿ™‚

  8. Pingback: Feathered Pairs~ โ€” (don’t miss a single photograph…Cindy’s pictures are gorgeous) | Rethinking Life

  9. What fun, Cindy. I wouldn’t believe that gull could get that fish down without seeing your photos. And then I imagined it swimming around in the gulls stomach. ๐Ÿ™‚ โ€“Curt

  10. Cindy, you’ve done it again — what beauties! My favorite? Probably the yellow-legs. After all, their reflections in the water make them look like ink blot tests, ha!

  11. How come? I do not understand how these birds swallow so big prey. It looks they are made from rubber. (lol…)
    I remember my grandmother in her ninetieth was afraid to choke on because people would say she is greedy. This is why she ate just very soft meal and bit by very small pieces. ๐Ÿ™‚ But these guys are not thinking like that and swallow whatever they caught.

  12. Loving all your bird pics, Cindy!
    I hope by the time you can travel safely again, you will have shot most of the species in the Holler!
    Sending love…about all I can do right now!

    • It’s sad. Sheltering for another year. So much life left to live and to see, and so much curtailed. I hope you are staying safe and well Resa. Love to you my friend แƒ“แƒ“

  13. Wonderful series of images Cindy, lovely and sharp. When I saw the first one of the gull with that huge fish in itโ€™s mouth, I thought โ€œno wayโ€! Well, apparently so!!

  14. Cindy, I am not only amazed by your feathered friends but also by the number of followers who comment on your posts. Really, I don’t know how you ever have the time to create new blogs when you choose to respond to these wonderful comments.
    I am in awe. Truly.
    P.S. We remain well in our little family tonight. Tonight is the first night Ella will sleep in her new “big girl” bed in her new bedroom to prepare for her little sister Molly who will be sleeping in the nursery in less than 3 weeks!

  15. My goodness, you take my breath away. That first series of photos are such remarkable slice-of-life pics. I love the reflections photo as well. You must love what you do, Cindy. I know I would.

  16. What a marvelous series of bird images, Cindy. You’ve captured many great poses and close-ups. Terrific vibrant, crisp shots. Looking forward to more of your work in the upcoming year! ๐Ÿ™‚

  17. The contemplation of your photos is a delight for the eyes. They are so well done that one can touch these majestic birds from the beach. You really have a unique talent to capture the images of birds and the landscape in an incredible way. Congratulations Cindy for your post.

  18. Love these feathered pairs, Cindy. Those pretty-in-two-tone-pink flamingos form perfect negative space for drawing, and the black of the water ripples echos their black beaks. I also like all those mirrored yellow legs against the blue water and the little wake spreading away from their legs on otherwise calm water. You really captured the arrival of the Holler Hawk!

  19. Another set of amazing pictures, Cindy. Unbelievable that the birdie eats the whole fishie in just one bite. I wish I could do that๐Ÿ˜นPawkisses for a wonderful weekend. Hope it’s a warm one where you live๐Ÿพ๐Ÿ˜ฝ๐Ÿ’ž

    • I would get in serious trouble if I could swallow that much, that fast, and fly away right after!!! ๐Ÿ˜‰ ๐Ÿ˜‰ Stay safe & warm my friend แƒ“แƒ“

  20. Cindy, Your pictures are amazing! You have inspired me to pick up the camera again. Your “About Me” page was so cute. I have a visual of where you live because you were so descriptive.

  21. Interesting…I thought I was already following you. That explains why I didn’t see your posts in the Reader. Anyway, great pics of our fine-feathered friends. The Bald Eagle is my favorite. He’s so serious and commanding…

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