Two heads~

Giraffes know that two heads,

work better than one.

You can look two ways at the same time,

and one head can prod another along!

Three heads are even better than two,

but prone to disagree about directions.

Compromise must be worked out.

Four heads can be confusing,

but giraffes will usually agree.

I wonder, why can’t we?

Cheers to you for the cooperative giraffes of Kruger National Park.

(Note: This is a reworked post from photos taken in 2015.)

208 thoughts on “Two heads~

  1. Years ago, I went to visit Kenya and of course I had to go and join a safari. I wanted to see the Elephants in the wild and the lions and fell in love with the Giraffes. Beautiful pictures, for the first one you should get nominated for an award like “Best Wildlife picture” or something similar.

  2. Giraffes really is majestic animals. We have been lucky to see them twice in the wild. First at Fathala Wildlife Reserve in Senegal and later at Etosha National Park in Namibia. Really hope to get a new possibility to enjoy their presence soon. ๐Ÿ™‚

    You really got some lovely photos on the animals. Have heard so much good about the possibilities to get great views at Kruger, will see if that is somewhere we will be heading later on. ๐Ÿ™‚

    • They are incredible to watch aren’t they. Some of the most amazing views of them that I have experienced were above The Oliphants River in Kruger where they would come to drink, oh so cautiously. They have to splay out their legs and bend those long necks down to get to the water and they look so vulnerable, fragile and beautiful. I am happy you have seen them in the wild. We had to go back a second time too! แƒ“

  3. Giraffe are among my favourite animals to encounter in the wild. You have portrayed them well in your inimitable style – lovely to see them ๐Ÿ™‚

    • They are such wonderful creatures. Amazing to watch them. I love when they are surprised, they seem to move in slow motion panic, because they are so large, it’s a time delay to get them moving, but when they move, watch out!! Such elegant creatures แƒ“

  4. Pingback: Two heads~ โ€” | Rethinking Life

  5. As always, I love your talent and the visual story-telling captured in your images, and then…. there is the next layer of this scrumptious dessert, youโ€™re elegant and graceful zingers of truth with a touch of icing. Always a pleasure!๐Ÿ˜โ˜ฎ๏ธ

  6. It is nice to redo a post with great pictures. Nowadays we don’t go anywhere so we have to reuse other ones and you did it wonderfully with your comments under the pics. Love it!

  7. Thank you for the smiles Cindy! I love the playful tone to your posts lately. I certainly need some play and lightness in my life. I remember being in awe the first time I saw giraffes at a zoo. I hope to one day see them and the other beautiful large animals of Africa. to more love and laughter! ๐Ÿงก

  8. The giraffe in the first picture really looks as if she has two heads. Amazing!…
    I always envy these animals for their long and thick lashes…
    Stay safe, dear Cindy!

  9. The giraffes going different directions. Now there is a giraffe willing to stick it’s neck out, Cindy! The first ones I ever encountered were on the Serengeti Plains. I was driving around in a VW bug. They were tall. ๐Ÿ™‚ โ€“Curt

    • Laughing….. Yep. They have reach!! I insisted we drive a sport-ut for or second trip. Jim booked a 4wd compact for the first. The elephants thought we were toys to play with, which of course we were ๐Ÿ˜‰

    • Well, I do photo shoots of them, which is super fun, and they are entranced by the camera, and like all children, beautifully photogenic. I can’t take photos when I take them places, because I am focused on keeping them alive as they tend to run really quite quickly, in opposite directions, to places they shouldn’t, laughing and saying, “No, no, no, no, no! Dangerous!” Two year old twins are tons of fun, and lots of exercise, but not so good at waiting while Nana takes photos! ๐Ÿ˜‰ ๐Ÿ˜‰

  10. I like to imagine the surprise, in days gone by, when someone would see a giraffe for the first time. There are a few stories of giraffes brought out of Africa as gifts to royalty of various countries and treated like royalty themselves, with their aristocratic faces and coats that look like pure velvet.

    • Can you imagine trying to describe a giraffe to someone who hasn’t seen one! Sorta like Plato in the cave. I doubt I could get it right, and I certainly couldn’t draw it, and even if I could, who would believe it?

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